REVERE AND GE CHIMING CLOCKS
   
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Introduction to Revere/GE Clocks


Although many clock collectors may not realize it, 1928 marked a pinnacle in the development of antique clocks and it's history. This was the year Walter Herschede released to the public a New Westminster movement under a new company called Revere. What was so unusual about this was the fact the clock ran on electricity.

The technology on this was based on another development invented by a clockmaker named Henry Warren. Just a decade earlier, Henry Warren developed a very unique drive-motor that itself did not run on an electrical current. Actually dubbed a “Rotor” (not motor), this brass capsule encased a tiny movement, was oil-filled, then totally sealed. The rotor itself was powered by an electrical coil, which surrounded it. The coil generated a magnetic field, which in turn, would spin the tiny gears inside the rotor. With electricity now being delivered at exactly 60-cycles per second, the electromagnetic field was able to run the rotor at a precise 1-RPM.

Increasing Popularity

Up until around 2000, none of the Telechron, General Electric, or Revere clocks were able to find a place in horological history. Actually considered by most clockmakers to be “Throw-aways”, they were dismissed as being inferior to key-wind clocks. During the 1990’s, it was possible to purchase a Revere or General Electric Westminster clock for no more than a dollar or two.
The new millennium offered up a new generation of people now discovering these clocks hidden in basements and attics. These clocks, belonging to some passed family member, were once again being put on shelves and mantles. Incredibly, the rotors now pushing 50-70 years old, still worked as good as the day they were made. We must note here that most of these clocks do need service work after all these years. Not all the rotors still work, though they can still be rebuilt.

Other collectors or buyers looking to purchase a true Westminster clock had very little choices. Key-wind clocks were quickly rising in price. Quartz movements just totally lacked realistic sound. Now all of a sudden, these cheap electric clocks seemed to be a viable alternative. Only after acquiring them did people begin to realize the high quality that every one of these clocks had. Since 2000 (and especially since 2005), values of these clocks have risen dramatically.
Telechron, GE and Revere Clocks offer collectors a chance to peek into the life style of several American Periods. From the Art Nouveau period of the 1920's through the Atomic Age of the 1950's, each decade refelcted different styles and looks of American homes. Today, these clocks are sought after by professional decorators and individuals creating a period look in certain rooms of their houses.

Find Out More

Please take a look through the Revere and GE sections of our web site. We have compiled a complete history of Revere and GE Westminster clocks, a section on how to date your clock, a Quick-Look Gallery to help identify your clock, and a comprehensive gallery of close to 150 Revere and General Electric Clocks containing descriptions, model numbers, original prices, dimensions, and catalog and actual photographs. There is a section of unknown clocks that perhaps you can help us ID. We remain dedicated to selling, servicing, and cataloging Revere and General Electric Westminster clocks. Please feel free to contact us with your information, pictures, and questions.


Revere Clocks Service Manual


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Yes, the same one you see for sale all over the internet for $8-$9. Ours is FREE.
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Interesting information they supplied with the Revere Westminster Clock

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